Kernel 5: Config Options

There are hundreds of configuration options. Basically, be aware of these ones: Power Management Options – If you’re using a pre-2001 computer, do NOT install ACPI or APM. Otherwise, be clear which options your chipset supports. IRDA Support – If you don’t need it, ditch it. ISDN Subsystem – If you’re not using ISDN, ditch …

Kernel 4: make Options

You should be in /usr/src/linux-2.6** (the new directory). Before you start, you need to clean your configuration directories. (We’ll simply assume you have run previous kernel compiles.) Type: make mrproper Also, open the Makefile in a text editor and find the config value EXTRAVERSION. This configuration option lets assign a version number to your own …

Kernel 3: Get the Source Code

  From the Red Hat Linux Bible: Fedora Core 3 disks include older kernel source code From The Linux Kernel Archives: http://www.kernel.org/ From FTP sites: ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/ , ftp://tsx-11.mit.edu/ From any Fedora or other distro download libraries; look for CD ISOs with .src in their names From /usr/src/<kernel_version> on your existing computer, assuming you’re going to …

Building a Kernel

This example uses Fedora Core 4. Other distros will be similar, but not identical. Why Build Your Own Kernel? Optimizing for a particular processor Adding specific drivers: “disk-only” drivers for some IDE disks, and issues with IDE CD-ROMs Removing unnecessary drivers (most are external modules, but some are internally compiled) Networking: Gigabit ethernet vs 100 …

Using Kickstart

Review Chapter 2, Installing Red Hat Linux, pp. 41-46 Automating Installations When rolling out multiple Red Hat installations, you can use a system similar to using Difference Files in Windows. As in this type of multiple installation in Windows, you start by building one machine and using it as a template for the rest. The …