A+ 220-1001: Day 2: CPUs

  1. A+ Certification
  2. A+ 220-1001: Day 1: Intro, Resources & the Test
  3. A+ 220-1001: Day 2: CPUs
  4. A+ 220-1001: Day 2: RAM
  5. A+ 220-1001: Day 3: Firmware, Motherboards & Power Supplies
  6. A+ 220-1001: Day 4: Disks & Mass Storage
  7. A+ 220-1001: Day 5: Peripherals & PC Builds
  8. A+ 220-1001: Day 6: Windows Operations, User Management & Windows Maintenance
  9. A+ 220-1001: Day 7: The Command Line & Troubleshooting
  10. A+ 220-1001: Day 8: Displays & Networking
  11. A+ 220-1002: Day 9: Ethernet & WiFi
  12. A+ 220-1002: Day 10: The Internet & Virtualization
  13. A+ 220-1002: Day 11: Portable & Mobile Computing
  14. A+ 220-1002: Day 12: Mobile Administration & Printing
  15. A+ 220-1002: Day 13: Security & Operations
  16. A+ 220-1002: Day 14:
  17. A+ 220-1002: Day 15:

System Essentials

CPUs

RISC vs CISC

 

 

8 bit, 16, 32 and 64 bit OSs, processors and system buses
Note
8 and 16 bit CISC: Intel 8088 and 8086: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_8088

 

Note
32 bit CISC: Intel i386 / x86 architecture: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_80386

 

Note

 

 

Note
Why x86 64-bit isn’t real 64-bit: Extended Memory: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extended_memorytext5

 

 

Chip Variants

https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/processors/core/i7-processors.html

Packaging: PGA, BGA, LGA, Slot 1 and Slot A, soldered

 

Note
ZIF Sockets: Zero Insertion Force: https://www.google.com/search?q=zif+socket

 

 

 

Intel rebels against “compatible” processors:

 

Ultimately compact:

 

Yes, CPUs and GPUs can melt their solder:

Note
Introducing Louis Rossman and JayzTwoCents: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=resoldering+a+gpu

 

Where You’ll See CISC

In almost every desktop (i.e. Intel architecture) and most laptops.

Where You’ll See RISC

Cell phones, tablets, most Chromebooks, UNIX workstations and servers, and coming in Macbooks. Oh, and Raspberry Pies and lots of single-board computers (SBCs).

Processor Advances

Multitasking

Pre-emptive vs. Co-operative

Multithreading

Allowing more than one thread to run simultaneously, eg. Intel Hyperthreading.

Multiprocessing (Multiple Processor Cores)

Putting more than one CPU core on a single die or package.

Overclocking

Meet Paul’s Hardware, JayzTwoCents, Gamers Nexus and more…

Paul’s Hardware:

JayzTwoCents: https://www.youtube.com/c/Jayztwocents/playlists

Textbook Time

Chapter 3