Network+ : IPv6

  1. Network+ Certification
  2. Network+ Certification – Introductions and Resources
  3. Network+ : From Physical Topologies to Media and Network Devices
  4. Network+ : Networking Variants, Physical Installation
  5. Network+ : TCP/IP and Network Operations
  6. Network+ : Network Naming and Sharing Resources
  7. Network+ : IPv6
  8. Network+ : Remote, Secure and Cross-Platform Networking
  9. Network+ : Servers and Support
  10. Network+ : WiFi
  11. Routing and Firewalls
  12. Network+: Routing Protocols
  13. Network+: Network Monitoring

IPv6 Basics and Address Notation

IPv6 addresses are 128 bits long

Link Local Addresses

Start with:

fe80:0000:0000:0000

The second half is the Host ID

0001:0002:0003:0004

The full Link Local address is like:

fe80:0000:0000:0000:0001:0002:0003:0004

External IPv6 Addresses

The first half is the Network Number, given by the nearest router upon boot

Start with a number in the 2000s:

2004:1234:5678:90ab

The second half is the Host ID

0001:0002:0003:0004

The full address is like:

2004:1234:5678:90ab:0001:0002:0003:0004

Address Shortening Rules

1. Leading zeros can be dropped, eg. :0223: becomes :223:

2. Continuous groups of four zeros can be abbreviated as :: , eg. :0000:0000:0000: becomes ::

3. But you can only use that abbreviation once.

4. All CIDRs are /64

5. IPv6 loopback is ::1

Multicast

No more broadcast in IPv6. You can multicast to all nodes (think all computers) at

ff02::1

or all routers at

ff02::2

This is the address our NIC cries out to, to find a router and join an IPv6 network.

Anycast

There’s not much like it in IPv4. In IPv6, it allows several systems scattered over large distances to share the same address. Thus anyone anywhere can ask for that address, and automatically connect to the nearest system. Think of Google or Youtube: you just need the closest server, not any particular server.

RIRs

DHCP

DNS

Tunneling

4to6

6in4

Teredo, Miredo

ISATAP